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Conveyancing 

Buying and selling houses in Scotland
At Stewart & Bennett we don’t believe in re-inventing the wheel so we recommend the Law Society of Scotland’s general guidance pages as a good source of information on the basics of buying or selling a house in Scotland. If you don’t have access to the internet.....then how are you reading this?

We do believe in putting our knowledge and experience of the market to good use, for each and every client who consults us. There are local variations across Scotland in the way things tend to be done. The housing market across the whole UK is constantly changing as mortgage finance continues to be refined and redirected. But the number one thing to do if you are buying property in Scotland is to speak to a solicitor before you show your hand in price negotiations. A solicitor will ensure you have seen a Home Report, and understand it, before any offer is made.

There is a growing trend in the Scottish market, for those who are selling their houses with a view to buying another – whether ‘trading up’ or ‘trading down’ – to sell first, perhaps even renting for a while, then buy. If you have sold a house, then even if you still need a mortgage for the next one – as most people do – you will be a very attractive prospect to sellers.

Another trend is for developers to sell new-build houses under shared equity schemes, or part-exchange schemes.

These trends constantly evolve and at Stewart & Bennett we realise that you are consulting us for our specific advice on your purchase and sale, and that you ‘take it as read’ that we will carry out the necessary legal work.

Update 1 May 2012
We have received several instructions recently in connection with properties being sold at auction. When you buy land or buildings at auction you will have to give your solicitor’s name and pay a deposit on the spot. The balance is usually due 28 days later. This is simply to allow the conveyancing to take place. Your solicitor will not be able to get you out of the deal even if the title is troublesome. If you are considering buying at auction you should obtain the catalogue well in advance and consult your solicitor immediately if you are intending to bid on a property. This gives your solicitor the chance to get the title pack from the auctioneers and advise you of any pitfalls. This may cost you a fee but you might avoid a pig in a poke.



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